Overmatter 28.01.13

Mr Magazine examines the idea that magazines will follow the way of music, decides they do have one thing in common – the letter ‘M’.

Seems design agency Pentagram and music trade mag Billboard agree, as the former redesigns the latter.

And here is Mr M again, sharing the failure of magazines that gave up on print.

Meanwhile, Poynter reports that ‘print’s financial future may last longer than expected.

‘Content’ might be the latest marketing wheeze but there is good content and bad content, argues Paul Keers.

A history of the early days of Print magazine.

Condé Nast UK are to launch a young version of Vogue, ignoring the US name Teen Vogue in favour of the more demure Miss Vogue.

Forget the tax return – the D&AD 2013 Awards deadline looms: this Wednesday, January 30th. And coming soon, the Design Week Awards.

 

Overmatter 07.01.13

The Observer continues to highlight new print magazines, this time in literary New York.

Magazine. Critique. Middle East: hello, Journal Junkie.

Mr Magazine sees off Newsweek’s print edition.

Reader’s Digest UK operation closes retail division but plans to keep mag going.

MagPile Awards now in first stage of judging, shortlists soon.

 

Ten things to look out for in 2013

• The continued reworking of UK Harper’s Bazaar by Marissa Bourke.

• The redesign of Wallpaper* by recently appointed creative director Sarah Douglas (with art director Lee Belcher).

• Issue two of indie motorbike mag Head Full of Snakes.

• This years AGI Open conference, here in London this September.

• The reinvention of of US Wired by new editor-in-chief Scott Dadich.

The Guardian entering its post-Mark Porter era with Alex Breuer as creative director.

• Sadly, more publishers responding in idiotic fashion to closures.

• While others continue to launch exciting new titles (check last year’s launches).

• A new magazine conference taking place in Munich at the end of February, news to come.

• And lastly a shameless plug: the publication of my new book ‘The Modern Magazine’ in September.

 

Overmatter 21.12.12

Monocle24’s The Stack goes native tomorrow, with host Tyler Brulé talking to the Monocle magazine team about their editorial highlights of the year and how they see the industry changing in the new year. Editor Andrew Tuck, Creative Director Richard Spencer Powell and Photo Director, Poppy Shibamoto all feature.

A Flickr pool full of The Face.

Newspapers: it’s not the drop in print ad sales but the small scale of digital revenues that matters according to The Atlantic.

Newmanology has the best collection of Christmas front covers. Jingle, jingle!

 

Overmatter 03.12.12

News Corp finally closes their iPad-only ‘newspaper’ The Daily; last issue December 15. Cue ‘the end of digital’ stories. See what I wrote on its launch.
UPDATE: An insider’s story.

This is how The Economist is dealing with digital: charging separately for it.

A look back at M magazine, published in the eighties for ‘The Civilized Man’.

Don’t forget this weeks New York meeting of the Little Magazine Coalition.

And if you’re in Cyprus later this month, MagDossier is a must-see.

 

Overmatter 02.11.12

D&AD announce this years awards juries, including the Magazine and Newspaper team, headed by Mark Porter and including Richard Turley and Jo Cochrane.

New York Times Magazine editor Hugo Lindgren pays tribute to Eureka magazine.

I spoke at Mr Magazine’s ACT II conference last year and found it an inspiring event; here’s a review of this year’s ACT III.

Martha Stewart’s publishing company contracts; titles for sale, staff redundant.

See/hear about the new issue of Aortica magazine, the Auckland issue (video).

Seven reasons to consider print for your content strategy (thanks Carl).

 

Newsweek axes print

The final print edition of Newsweek will appear on Dec 31 this year, after which the title will be digital-only. Meanwhile The Guardian are busy denying reports – in today’s Daily Telegraph – that they are planning a similar move soon.

More on Newsweek here.

 

Overmatter 16 07 12

Newscorp to decide on future of Rupert Murdoch’s much-trumpeted but poor The Daily news app.

Back in 1989 Emigré wrote about the challenge to designers presented by the arrival of a new technology, in that case the then new DTP software. Strikingly similar issues face us today as we add interactivity to our workflow.

Magazines – the new bling?

Five strategies to avoid getting lost in the filter bubble, including editor-as-curator.

British woman has a collection of magazines for sale including 80s Vogues. Email her for details: alicemariegrace11 [at] live.co.uk

 

News of the World, RIP

I couldn’t bring myself to buy a copy of last Sunday’s final edition of the News of the World, but here for the record is its front page. Apparently it included just a few paragraphs about the phone-hacking scandal that brought about its demise; otherwise it was a look back at the many stories, some important, it has broken over the years.

Like most people I’m relishing seeing Murdoch’s corporation wobble and cheer at the thought it might yet come crashing down. But I also share Peter Wilby’s concerns expressed in his excellent Guardian piece yesterday. The NotW at its best had a role to play in checking those in power. In classic ‘Animal Farm’ style it latterly mislaid that role and started abusing power itself. It may be a victim of its own excesses but who/what will assume that previous role?

The other thing to note is that the hugely successful NotW effectively subsidised Murdochs loss-making Times and Sunday Times newspapers. Will the Times go next? If it gets sold who would buy it?

While we await further twists I recommend a read of Adam Curtis’ excellent summary of Murdoch’s 1968 arrival in the UK to buy his first media property. Which was, of course, a newspaper called the News of the World. It’s the start of the current story in every sense.

 

The Last Issue

Here’s the final issue of Design Week, published yesterday. Without time to prepare a special goodbye – the team were told at 10am Monday morning – it’s a regular issue with a brief note from the publishers about the titles digital future, a bravely positive letter from departing editor of 22 years Lynda Relph-Knight, and this bold cover.

Part of a broader shake-up at Centaur Publishing that also sees the closure of New Media Age and 60 jobs lost, the Design Week team has been cut back to three people. They will work under Creative Review editor Patrick Burgoyne.

Creative Review already has a very strong digital presence, so it’ll be interesting to see how the two titles co-exist online. The CR blog has been a huge success, extending the Creative Review brand internationally and increasing ad income. Design Week’s model was quite different, their blog a subscriber-only service.

 

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