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The Plant, LAW, Lost
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The Plant, LAW, Lost

January may be a slow month for new releases (the usual post-holiday lull...) but it’s always a good month for observing which magazines continue to go strong.

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Barcelona’s The Plant is one such example. There’s not much new to say about it - we’ve covered the magazine in detail over its 10 issue career - but it’s interesting to note how it’s quietly been transitioning from a relatively unknown to a more ubiquitous indie title, the kind you see in lifestyle boutiques and not simply in specialist stores. The brand new issue 10 mixes stunning flower photography by Nick Knight, an interview with gardener Dan Pearson and a look at the garden of Juergen Teller’s much-covered new studio/house. The featured plant is ‘Elephant Ear’ and the issue has a double cover (another sign of confidence).

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A second title that has moved past a point of trepidation and now is a reliable regular is London-based LAW (Lives and Works). The moody photography and fashion zine has had a strong look from the start, and with each issue it hones and tightens that vision. It celebrates the overlooked everyday England with a healthy mix of cynicsim and wit. If you’re quick you can pick up a free copy at the magCulture Shop.

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Lastly, we celebrate the third year of Shanghai’s Lost this week, an annual travel tome that relishes in taking the path less travelled. Like LAW, it’s had a self-assured design from the start and a clear understanding of its own brand. It’s often said that if a magazine survives three issues and readers still continue to show interest and loyalty, then it’s found a winning formula. Lost may be one of the youngest titles mentioned here today, yet it’s presence on indie magazine shelves is to be expected.<

What we can learn from these three very different titles is obvious yet something many magazine makers overlook: clarity of vision and a commitment to a single, excellent idea is often the key to longevity.

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