Skip to content
Get closer to magCulture with the new magCulture Club! Click to find out more…
Get closer to magCulture with the new magCulture Club!
Clay Hickson, illustrator
Issues

Clay Hickson, illustrator

Today we’re in Chicago visiting illustrator Clay Hickson at his risograph press, Tan & Loose. Clay’s colourful, tongue-and-cheek work is a staple of many well-loved publications—from independent classics like Printed Pages to big names like Bloomberg Businessweek. One of his risograph posters was also recently featured in a new favourite from the States, Editorial Magazine.

Portrait copy

We asked Clay to choose three magazines: a new one, an old one, and a detail from one that he especially admires.

LUCKY PEACH

LUCKY PEACH 1 LUCKY PEACH 2 LUCKY PEACH 3 LUCKY PEACH 4

New issue: Lucky Peach
I wouldn't describe myself as a ‘foodie’ or even particularly interested in restaurant culture, but I do love to eat. My taste leans towards the lowbrow’ cuisines - diners, street foods, etc, which is why I love Lucky Peach. It serves as a completely unpretentious guide to food for people that just think eating is fun. That coupled with its amazing list of illustrators and experimental art direction makes for a truly great magazine.

AVANT GARDE

AVANT GARDE 9

AVANT GARDE 7

AVANT GARDE 3

AVANT GARDE 1

Old issue: Avant Garde
My first encounter with Avant Garde was when a friend found issue #5 at a flea market. The cover features a striking Tom Wesselmann painting and the rest of the magazine does not disappoint. Although it's probably best know for it's amazing logo, Avant Garde is a sexually charged window into the 1960’s counter-culture that I desperately wish I had experienced. It's full of psychedelic photos, left wing political propaganda and good old-fashioned dirty jokes.

Push Pin Graphic #54(2)

Push Pin Graphic #54 Push Pin Graphic #54(3)

And another thing… Push Pin Graphic 54, The South
I've never actually seen this issue in person but the statement is clear. Seymour Chwast's powerful commentary on the violent racism that took place in the South is a beautifully executed and tragic work of art. To quote the Seymour Chwast Archive, ‘A bullet hole (the black dot in each image) was die-cut through every spread, depicting the brutal death of those killed in pursuit of equality.’

clayhickson.com

Previous post Cathy Olmedillas, Dot
Next post 17.03.16